Immigration, Ethnicity and Diversity in 150 Years of Canada Looking Back, Going Forward

October 23-24 2015

Hilton Lac Leamy, Ottawa?Gatineau, Ontario

The Association for Canadian Studies and the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association
5th Annual Conference

October 23-24, 2015

Hilton Lac Leamy, Ottawa, Gatineau, Ontario

Immigration, Ethnicity and Diversity in 150 Years of Canada: Looking Back, Going Forward

The Association for Canadian Studies and the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association invite proposals for our joint annual conference entitled "Immigration, Ethnicity and Diversity in 150 Years of Canada: Looking Back, Going Forward" to be held October 23-24, 2015 in Gatineau-Ottawa, Ontario.

The conference also marks the 24th conference of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association and the fifth in a series of conferences jointly organized with the Association for Canadian Studies. The Conference will offer a unique opportunity to exchange views and ideas.

As Canada approaches 150 years as a nation this conference provides an opportunity for scholars and other researchers to reflect back on its immigration history and on the history of various ethnic groups.  As well, this conference provides an opportunity to look ahead and reflect upon the impact of immigration and diversity on the country's future.

Pre-confederation Canada was already diverse with Aboriginal and Metis peoples, French, and English. During the forty years following   Confederation Canada's diversity intensified with the in-migration of Germans, Dutch, Scandinavians, Russian Doukhobors,  Africans,  Chinese, Japanese and others. In 1896 Canada's first coherent immigration policy emerged under Clifford Sifton, Minister of the Interior, in Sir Wilfred Laurier's government and resulted in massive European immigration to Canada up until 1914. However, Canada's immigration policy from the early 1900s through to the late 1960s was explicitly ethnocentric and racist with very little immigration from non-white areas of the world including Africa, Asia, and South America. With the revision in 1967 of Canada's immigration act and the introduction of the points system, Canada moved away from an explicitly ethnocentric and racist immigration policy and this heralded considerably more ethnic and religious diversity in Canada resulting in a veritable demographic revolution.

Theoretical and empirically-based sessions and paper proposals are invited that address - but are not limited to - issues with reference to Canada's ethnic and immigration history and how this history shapes our understanding of contemporary Canada and how things may evolve going forward:

  • How has immigration contributed to the transformation of Canada into an ethno-culturally diverse nation?
  • What are the challenges, opportunities, and lessons learned in 150 years of Canada creating a socially just and inclusive society?
  • How do we best teach Canadians about 150 years of immigration, ethnic group formation and diversity?
  • What is the historical relationship of ethnicity to Canadian citizenship with respect to particular ethnic groups and/or state policy?
  • How has past immigration, settlement, and integration policy in Canada affected and shaped ethnicity and belonging in Canada?
  • What has been the impact of the policy and model of Multiculturalism on the ethnic and national identities?
  • What are the current challenges in the measurement of diversity especially with regard to its economic and social characteristics?
  • What impact has minority ethnic identification had on aboriginality, official language minorities and French and British origin Canadians?
  • What the future directions for ethnic studies in Canada and for immigration and multiculturalism policies?

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, poster and video presentations that address any of the above topics in Canada.  Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study, including the humanities and the social sciences. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Association for Canadian Studies and Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration, and citizenship issues in Canada. University professors, graduate students, and other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services ? all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. Shorter papers can be submitted for consideration in ACS's Canadian Diversity. To be considered for publication in either journal, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal's guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the joint ACS/CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Please visit our websites: umanitoba.ca/publications/ces/call_for_papers.html and www.acs-aec.ca for more information. Presentation and poster submissions should be directed electronically to Sarah Kooi, Association for Canadian Studies at: sarah.kooi@acs-aec.ca

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, roundtables, and poster presentations is
September 18, 2015.
 


2016 ACS. All rights reserved
Web site creation: Bang Marketing agency
EV SSL Certificate